Please don’t conduct a conference call from the blanket fort: How to find and vet great freelancers, Part 2

Once you’ve found your amazing freelancer, whose work you love and whose attitude is cheerful, collaborative and efficient, how do you onboard her for long-term success?

First, understand your company’s culture regarding freelancers. Are freelancers and contractors, such as for the IT department and graphic designers, considered ‘warm bodies’ to keep basic operations going if everybody else has the flu? Or do you consider freelancers and contractors to be a ‘talent halo’ that enhances, expands and amplifies staff expertise?

Smart content marketers actually promote the experience and credentials of top freelancers to get approval for projects. For example, if you are building out client case studies and related white papers, you gain credibility when you can show that you’ve already got on board a freelancer who has written the same type of material that won new business. Or, a freelancer whose work has appeared in widely respected publications and online outlets proves that you are investing in top-quality writing and content.

Experienced freelancers can pick and choose clients. (An ongoing topic of conversation among freelancers is how to fire clients. Don’t be that client.)

Here’s how you can get off to a great start with the freelancers who will make your content project a success.

  • Pay market rates, on time. Market rates start at $1 a word for writing web content and articles; $400 per blog post of 300 – 600 words; $40 an hour for copyediting; $90 an hour for line editing; and $800 a day for communication coaching and consulting.
  • Offer assignments that support the freelancer’s own professional development goals. Get to know your freelancers. How do they want to grow? Do they want to branch into new topics or new forms of writing, such as writing scripts for videos? Give them opportunities.
  • Collaborate on concept and assignment development. As your freelancers become familiar with your needs, your company and your industry, they’ll have ideas. Pull them in for planning and you’ll all be smarter.
  • Respond promptly to the freelancer’s status updates and questions.
  • Refer & recommend the freelancer to new clients, internal and external. Don’t hoard your freelance list. Likewise, remember that your freelancers probably have their own networks of accomplished freelancers in complementary fields, such as graphic design, photography and video production.
  • Bring the freelancer consistent work; this gives you the right to ask for emergency work.

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